The Three Stages of Alzheimer’s - Approved Home Health

The Three Stages of Alzheimer’s

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s and one in three seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia. There is no cure for Alzheimer’s, but early detection can provide relief from some associated symptoms.

The symptoms of Alzheimer’s and dementia worsen over time and can be classified as early-, mid- and late-stage Alzheimer’s.

In the early stage, the person might still be able to perform everyday activities. He or she might not be able to pinpoint anything specific that is going on, and may just assume it is part of the natural aging process. Loved ones might notice the symptoms first, including:

  • Losing important things
  • Forgetting people’s names
  • Difficulty with words
  • Short-term memory problems

The middle stage usually is the longest, lasting for many years. Problems speaking will become more noticeable and because the nerves are becoming damaged, things that once were simple will become more difficult. At this point, it is more difficult for the person to take care of him- or herself. Symptoms in this stage include:

  • Confusion with days and time passage
  • Inability to remember personal facts
  • Difficulty controlling bodily functions
  • Wandering off and becoming lost

Late-stage Alzheimer’s, leaves the patient unable to communicate or respond to the environment. He or she might speak a few words, but communication is not possible, and the person most likely will need constant help and or supervision. In this stage, he or she might:

  • Need 24/7 care
  • Become susceptible to illness
  • Gradually lose the ability to function and even swallow

While there isn’t a cure, there are medications, alternative therapies, and trial studies that can help during the earlier stage of the disease. Support groups available for help and information can be found here.

Approved Home Health provides care for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients that allows clients to remain in the home and offers relief to primary caregivers. Call today for your complimentary in home nursing assessment at 941-870-8740.

Read more at http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_stages_of_alzheimers.asp?type=carecenter_footer